Demolition Starts this Saturday. New Boardwalk by this summer? WHAT??

“Long Beach last month selected a Farmingdale firm to handle the removal for $1.435 million. The work will likely take a month, officials said.

Meanwhile, the city is preparing a request for proposals from firms for the design of a new boardwalk. The request will be issued early this year, Mandel said.

[City Councilman, Scott] Mandel said the city hopes the new boardwalk will be in place by the summer. City officials have said it could cost $25 million.”

Read full article @ Newsday: Long Beach boardwalk demolition to start Saturday

wood

Opinion:

I’ve said it once and will say it again: full credit goes to City Manager Jack and our City Council for acting so fast on this. Sorry folks, but the old boardwalk has to go… I hate to say it. I really do. I am going to miss the old wood a lot, but the sad reality is this: If we are to move forward, we need to do a full rebuild with better material. I will always be an advocate of harder wood and screws, but I know that’s not going to happen.

So that just leaves us with concrete and plastic. Let us just remember what a mess concrete has been for Coney Island: READ – Design Commission Keeps Concrete Away From Coney Island Boardwalk.

Just PLEASE pick a material that absorbs heat, is easy on the knees while jogging and isn’t too hot to walk barefoot on. Hey, hard wood sounds perfect!!

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21 thoughts on “Demolition Starts this Saturday. New Boardwalk by this summer? WHAT??”

  1. Those interested in seeing what a possible sea wall would look like (hint, it wouldn’t involve putting up a fifteen foot concrete wall and putting a pathway on top of it where the boardwalk is), check out NatGeo’s Megastrcture episode on the North Sea Wall:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yAoPphN4TOU

    You can see a fairly representative photo here:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Oosterscheldekering-pohled.jpg

    And the wikipedia article here:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oosterscheldekering

    Even the video of of the Arcadis proposal for NYC is not merely a tall wall ringing Manhattan where the land meets the sea, though their wall would be tricky in that it must open and close for shipping traffic.

    So if Long Beach were to have a sea wall built, would it extend from the western point of Jones Beach and go past PLO, LB, AB and end at the Rockaways somewhere? Would NYC want the Long Beach Island sea wall to extend further west? How far? JFK? All of Queens? Brooklyn? Span the Lower Bay? All the way to Jersey? Would they want to be behind it instead of merely beside it?

    Hypothetically, a wall (the ends of which would have to be determined, do we just wall off the entire north east?) is now built. It was somehow paid for AND the morons who complains about seeing windmills off the coast to generate power were somehow convinced that a wall miles long was OK. Great. Now what do we do with the boardwalk. Keep it a boardwalk?

  2. Those interested in seeing what a possible sea wall would look like (hint, it wouldn’t involve putting up a fifteen foot concrete wall and putting a pathway on top of it where the boardwalk is), check out NatGeo’s Megastrcture episode on the North Sea Wall:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yAoPphN4TOU

    You can see a fairly representative photo here at this wikipedia page:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oosterscheldekering

    Even the video of of the Arcadis proposal for NYC is not merely a tall wall ringing Manhattan where the land meets the sea, though their wall would be tricky in that it must open and close for shipping traffic.

    So if Long Beach were to have a sea wall built, would it extend from the western point of Jones Beach and go past PLO, LB, AB and end at the Rockaways somewhere? Would NYC want the Long Beach Island sea wall to extend further west? How far? JFK? All of Queens? Brooklyn? Span the Lower Bay? All the way to Jersey? Would they want to be behind it instead of merely beside it?

    Hypothetically, a wall (the ends of which would have to be determined, do we just wall off the entire north east?) is now built. It was somehow paid for AND the morons who complains about seeing windmills off the coast to generate power were somehow convinced that a wall miles long was OK. Great. Now what do we do with the boardwalk. Keep it a boardwalk?

  3. The city should not be rushing to rebuild the boardwalk. They should be working with the Army Corp of Engineers to build a sea wall or dunes first, then worry about the boardwalk. Once a boardwalk is built it will be harder and more expensive to build any sort of sea wall.

  4. agreed. one of the problems with the wood is that it warped and bowed upwards becuase when it bowes, it brings the nails along with it. screws will keep the boards down and will not budge. while screws are more labor intensive (as opposed to a nail gun), the cost will still be less that using Trex or any other synthetic.

  5. the one problem with a sea wall is that if the water gets over the sea wall, the city will turn into a bath tub and water will not recede. while sandy destroyed us, at least the water receded with the tide. if there was a sea wall, the water would have nowhere to go once it breaches and we would have had bigger problems (scarey to think that it could’ve been worse).

  6. “We’re going to rebuild stronger, smarter and safer, and it’s imperative that we have a boardwalk as soon as possible,” said Gordon Tepper, a city spokesman.

    That pretty much says it all… wrong attitude completely.

  7. I live right by the boardwalk and without it taking the brunt of the assault by the waves my building would not be structurally sound today.We cant go into the next hurricane season without protection.

  8. The Black Asphault Absorbs Heat. When a Police Vehicle Drives over the black asphault the tires absorb the heat. When that/those same police vehicles drive over the boards of the boardwalk, the Vehicle’s Extremely Hot Tires Transfer the heat into ever board, resulting in warping, and expanding the nails inside their holes. I hope we’re open to concrete in the middle of the new boardwalk. It would be a hybrid, So The city vehicles can have less of an impact than they had on the past boardwalk. The organization/management of the old boardwalk was Obviously unsustainable. If we research & design the boardwalk to cater to all elements we can move ahead with other projects (Like a New Rec Center, etc) if we don’t have to keep throwing money at a continuous problem.

  9. By The Way, I like the piece of the Coney Island Concrete boardwalk hybrid. They said that the crack in that section (1/10 of the entire composition) was due to rushing. So Let’s take that as a major lesson as well.. It’s foolish to rush without weighing all of the ideas ethically.

  10. I think there is little chance of a new boardwalk by next summer.
    What has to be done:
    1. the current boardwalk must go [ a month? I wouldn’t bet on it ]
    2. the new walk must be designed, approved, bid, and constructed. all without a professional city engineer
    3. The Corps, the city, and others must have an approved plan for dunes, or another barrier. the barrier and boardwalk are likely to overlap in form and function.
    4. the city council and management are marginally able to make simple decisions let alone technically complex engineering decisions
    5. funding must be secured!

  11. Amen to that. The definition of insanity is to keep doing the same thing and expect a different result. I dont want to be scared to live in this beautiful city but if the politicians in Long Beach are going to take the same incredibly naive path again of not building viable protection from storm surges Long Beach is going to be an unsafe place to live. The law makers of Long Beach are only worried about lost revenue if the boardwalk is not opened by the summer season not about spending the money to make Long Beach a safe and affordable place to live where one dosen’t have to worry about losing their homes and livihood when the next storm hits.

  12. The City has different ideas than the residents about why the Boardwalk rebuild is important. For residents/taxpayers, the boardwalk rebuilding project represents a key part of a program to make the city less vulnerable to ocean surges, protecting our property and possessions. The City has other ideas. The City only cares about tourists and the money they spend at local businesses, so they want to have the project done by summer at all costs – which obviously means a quick and dirty rebuild using wood. That’s what we are going to get – a quick and dirty rebuild using wood, with some BS language about how new construction techniques makes this wood boardwalk so much better than the old one.

  13. The city can either move on this quickly, rebuild the boardwalk, and restore vital, basic storm protections while waiting for the corps to design a sea wall and dredging program. The Town can return to normalcy.

    OR this can turn into our version of the Big Dig, with the requisite beaurocratic purgatory.

  14. The law makers and the taxpayers are worried about lost revenue. Shelly maybe you don’t pay property taxes but I do. The boardwalk needs to be built why do you think ever other city or town in NY and NJ that has a boardwalk is working so hard to get theirs back up and running.
    The dunes will take years to built and mature. Congress can’t even pass a bill to finance the Army corp to do anything. When the Army Corp does come they will have no plan for the bayside. The Army Corp won’t build a seawall.

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