Anybody check out this thrift store on LB Blvd?

I’ve been meaning to check this place out myself, but haven’t found the time yet. Has anybody been there yet? That’s actually a pretty good use for a corner that’s been hard to rent.

2015-04-18 14.20.01

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32 thoughts on “Anybody check out this thrift store on LB Blvd?”

  1. been there, it’s packed so you can hardly move around but I’ve seen some pretty cool stuff there. The owner told me she also does a lot of donations to the city. If you find out more, I’d love to hear

  2. Historical Note: In the 1950’s-60’s that building was a Chevrolet dealership. On the south end of that same block, now a beverage distributor, There was a Nash automobile dealership.. Across LB Boulevard and at the corner of E Chester street there was a Studebaker Automobile dealership. A few blocks north on the east side of LB Blvd there were two blocks occupied by Fleischman Lincoln/Mercury/ Ford dealerships, and at the foot of the bridge where the Orthopedist is now there was a Dodge Dealership. Now there’s a thrift store on LB Blvd.–tells a story about the LB economy doesen’t it?

  3. i remember mostly small items but I’ve seen some furniture sitting outside…………also LOVE the bike and antique shop further up LB Blvd!

  4. This place is a scam. I assumed it was a charitable organization with a 501(c)(3) status. I noticed the religious items and Hebrew writing on some signage in the window so I asked the owner. She told she was getting it. I asked where the money was going. Get this, she told me she’s sending her kids to private school, and “you know, the tuition is expensive”. I was stunned. In the time I was there, two unsuspecting people dropped off multiple items. What a business plan. People give me free things assuming it’s a charity, and I’ll use the profits to send my kids to private school. The leftover unsellable crap get donated to someone else. If you don’t believe me, go ask her for yourself. Maybe her story has changed.

  5. Long Island bus riders Union sucks my channel is pinepowerli complain on there I know your a member.tell yuki to stop talking bs about me on YouTube

  6. No, it does not specifically say it’s a charity, but seeing religious items on display in the window like Crucifixes and Menorahs and Hebrew text on the door lead me to believe it was. I had items to donate that I would normally take to the Goodwill in Bellmore before it relocated. I asked can I get a receipt should I decide to take a tax deduction. That’s when the conversation started and she told me private school tuition is expensive and that’s were the money from sales goes. She was honest when specifically asked the question but I still think it’s a bit shady. An unbelievable clever business model.People go out of their way to give her things which she in turns sells to pay for private school.

  7. Hi John, I have seen your videos before about NICE and am surprised you havent worked alongside the LIBRU as we are all in the same fight for better County buses, increased funding, transparency and better commuter representation. I have travelled from here to the Hamptons on only County buses (2 days connecting bus to bus) with Legislatures, met with Senators, local leaders from municipalities in both counties, have spoken at NCounty legislature meetings and lobbied in Albany. LIBRU has been extremely proactive since the County privatized the buses, making certain that our elected leaders hold NICE accountable for the services they provide ( and as you know, they barely provide services) and LIBRU secured Sunday service in Suffolk, got 2million restored in Nassau and have built great relationships with elected leaders to make sure bus riders are not forgotten.

    To say LIBRU “sucks” is entirely not fair nor true when you consider just a few people, including Yuki, are behind all the efforts that have made County buses more bearable for the riders and bus drivers who also deal with a lot of crap.

  8. well that explains why our streets were designed so wide and grid like for automobiles and not people. Thankfully the 50s mentality is dying away bit unfortunately we are stuck with the horrible planning decisions of that generation.

  9. I’ve been in twice but didn’t get anything yet. I keep thinking I’d probably have bought something if the space was larger and I could only get to things or see them better, right now it’s packed cheek to jowl. But it’s interesting and worth checking out, the merchandise is quite eclectic.

    It makes no pretense as to what it is or isn’t. And I like having funky places like that in Long Beach. Heck the stuff is more interesting than the schlock at the Boardwalk Fairs. If you want to give to charitable organizations there are plenty, including the church on Riverside between Walnut and Olive. They are out there selling items almost every weekend.

  10. We at Nassau bus rider coalition have made great strides in our fight for bus riders in our county.Mr pine u are an idiot.our coalition started on may

  11. I was told the same thing as Unsustainable. When asked, the owner said she was a charity. When I asked what it supports she answered…it supports my kids going to private school. I think it is wrong for her to lead me to believe she is a charitable organization where the stuff I drop off is going to ultimately help the less fortunate. Instead, the stuff I was going to give her for free goes towards her kid getting a better education than mine!

  12. This is so wrong it’s ridiculous.

    If you want to give your stuff away – give it to St. Vincent’s du Paul – it’s a legitimate organization who physically hands $ to the people who need it.

    The Salvation Army is a good option for right wing ideolouges. I pretty much disagree with their anti-gay and exploitation of the mentally challenged, but the stuff you donate likely winds up to those who need it.

  13. If you’re not using it, recycle it. If someone else needs or can use it, that in itself is charitable whatever purpose its put to, or an intermediary gets. Do you think “charities” don’t pay salaries to those who work there?

  14. This is from Jeffrey Rosner, LBHS 1981, LB Lifeguard 1981-1988, my wife Elizabeth Rosner owns and manages New Like New Thrift Store , located at 515 Long Beach Blvd, Corner of East Hudson Street. The store currently does not have 5013c status. However what we have quietly accomplished so far, is furnish 15 families in need, with beds and couches and other necessities. As an example, some had 5 kids and 4 beds, or didn’t have a couch or spent all their money after the storm on the house and had nothing for furniture. There are some charitable organizations that regularly pickup clothing and games. We regularly have a bin of books available for free. Yes, the store is cluttered (what a blessing, because the opposite would not be good). There are many new and like new items arriving daily. We also provide funding for several local charity organizations. Thanks for your support and patronage.

  15. @Jeffrey…Just out of curiosity, since it’s not a charity, why should people stock your shelves with their stuff, for free? Most non-charity thrift shops buy people’s things off of them to sell.

  16. So your business plan is to get stuff for free, sell the good stuff for a profit to pay for your kids private school tuition and give away couches and beds that wouldn’t fit in your store anyway. Oh, forgive me , i forgot the free books. How exactly do you “provide funding” for local charities? What percentage of your profits goes to real charities?

  17. Geez, what is wrong with you people? If you or others have things you are not using that are taking up space, things which other people can use or even need, why not recycle them? What could be a better, higher use for your unwanted things? And what about people who may want or need those things who don’t have cars and can’t easily go to a thrift store in Hempstead or Baldwin, and can now get it locally? And you’re bitching?? Because you assumed something they never claimed or put on a sign and freely disclosed when asked?

    And why do those things only have to go to a charity? The trade and tradition has gone on for centuries. Google “rag and bone man”.

    Frankly, charitable or not, I think their recycling of unwanted things is an ecologically desirable, sound thing and practically a community service. I

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