Tag Archives: book

‘Scoundrels by the Sea’ is back in print and now available!

I just heard from Paul Jackson, the author of Scoundrels by the Sea:

‘Scoundrels by the Sea’ is back in print with the 3rd printing. Copies are now available at Amazon. Copies will be available at the L.B. Historical Society this week, but they’re not open every day during the summer.”
Definitely buy a copy at the LB Historical Society, but if you’re lazy and feel like supporting the blog, you can always use my affiliate link here: Scoundrels By The Sea / Amazon.com.

Great news for those looking to get a copy of Scoundrels by the Sea

UPDATE: MORE COPIES ARE AVAILABLE!!

“I love what you said about my book ‘Scoundrels by the Sea.’ It sounded so good that I’m going back to press! You are right — people shouldn’t have to pay $149 for a copy of the book. I’ll let you know when copies are available.”

-Paul Jackson

Yay! Great news for people like me who haven’t been able to read the book yet. I’ll post an update when the new pressings are available. For a backstory, please see my first post:  SCOUNDRELS BY THE SEA: BUY IT USED FOR $149!!! [PERHAPS I’LL WRITE PART II].

Scoundrels by the Sea: Buy it used for $149!!! [Perhaps I’ll write Part II]

UPDATE: MORE COPIES ARE AVAILABLE!!

Get yer copy of Scoundrels by the Sea by Paul Jackson,  before it’s too late! [LINK]. Prices on Amazon are between $149 to $599!!!!!!!!! Here is the book description from Amazon:

“Scoundrels by the Sea looks at the shady side of Long Beach, NY. It traces the extraordinary life of Senator William H. Reynolds, the Brooklyn builder and politician who turned the desolate sandbar on Long Island into a thriving city — a career marred by indictments for dishonest real estate dealings with New York City and for misusing city funds while mayor of Long Beach. The book dscribes a rogues’ gallery of Long Beach scoundrels: Phil Kohut, the Democratic leader who pocketed $23,500 in graft when the city purchased parking meters . . . Jerry Glucksman, the New York Assistant Attorney General in charge of fraud who was sent to the slammer for his own fraud . . . William Cahn, the Nassau County District Attorney, who was jailed for double-billing on his travel expenses . . . Joe Carlino, the Speaker of the New York State Assembly, who pushed a $100 million fallout shelter bill through the Legislature while serving on the board of directors of the largest fallout shelter manufacturer in the country . . . the bootleggers during Prohibition who operated with impunity in Long Beach — and with immunity from the local cops . . . the Long Beach cop who killed the Long Beach mayor . . . Jimmy Hines, the corrupt Tammany leader who lived for a quarter of a century in Long Beach (except for a four-year stretch in Sing Sing) . . . Doc Hirshberg who operated his own little Ponzi scheme at the same time he was fund-raising for the new Long Beach Hospital . . . and Larry Knohl, the convicted embezzler who lived beyond his liens. Their stories (and others) are told against a rich background of the city’s history. Some of these stories tell why Long Beach was the only municipality in America omitted from the 1920 U.S. census; why William Randolph Hearst took sides in the 1922 Long Beach election; why the charter for the City of New York was written in Long Beach; why the death of Starr Faithfull remains the biggest mystery in the annals of Long Beach; why the proposed Long Beach pier jutting out into the ocean was never built; why Long Beach in the 1930s wanted Robert Moses or Nassau County to take over the dilapidated boardwalk; and why the Chrysler Building was originally planned to be named the Reynolds Building. Paul Jackson writes about such names and places as the dancers Vernon and Irene Castle; Prohibition agents Izzy and Moe; August Heckscher, who once attempted to buy all of Lido Beach; and beautiful model Audrey Munson, the subject of a Long Beach romantic triangle, whose likeness appears on some two dozen statues and buildings in Manhattan.”

Holy cow, that sounds juicy! Has anybody read this book?  I missed my chance of buying a copy at a decent price, so I hope a newer edition is in the works.

On a side note: I swear I might have enough information for a Part II. I often think of writing a book about my experience of blogging about this city by the sea since 2008. One day I think I will. It would not only appeal to Long Beach folks, but also to those interested in the blogging medium in general. Oh yes it’ll be juicy. So juicy you’ll have to wear a bib when you read it.

Today’s blog is brought to you by the word: Juicy.

BOARDWALK STORIES: Long Beach in the 1950s-1970s! by Roslyn Bernstein

I grew up in Long Beach, moving to the West End from Brooklyn when I was a very young child. I spent my summers on the beach, worked the switchboard at the Hotel Lincoln, swam in Reynolds Channel, and fished for pennies under the boardwalk.  My Long Beach childhood was filled with many memories and I began to write a collection of short stories–fictional tales–all connected by the theme of life in a boardwalk town and all based loosely on Long Beach during the 1950s-1970s.

Once, when reading one of the stories at the Long Beach Historical Society, I learned that my LBHS classmate Dr. Lawrence Tydings was going to show vintage boardwalk photographs taken by his father, Dr. Kenneth S. Tydings (the town podiatrist) the following week. When I saw the photos, I realized that they were a perfect match to my stories.

For more on Boardwalk Stories see the website: www.blueeftpress.com
The book is for sale on Amazon.com for $17.50.
About the Book:

Boardwalk Stories is a collection of fourteen linked tales spanning the decades 1950-1970 which invite us into the private lives of the colorful denizens of a boardwalk community.

Set in the shadow of the Cold War, the boardwalk characters, many of them misfits and wannabes, share their joys and sorrows in a world where kewpie dolls and prizes are often the only consolations for lost dreams. Included in the cast are Beverly the Queen of the Skeeball arcade, Jollie Trixie the fat lady, Arnold the king of Playworld, Miss Lydia the famous ballerina, and Joey the orphan.
Each story is paired with a vintage black-and-white boardwalk photograph capturing the mood after World War II when a day out meant breathing in the bracing salt air and feeding coins into the machines at the penny arcade.

Long Beach Radio, Images of America book, “Character” Preservation

last night I had the pleasure of sitting in on a 1040AM WGBB radio broadcast which does a Long Beach segment every Tuesday between 8 & 9pm.  I got to meet a bunch of great people including Halftime Howie (the host),  the Long Beach Lady Hockey Maven & Dave Roochvarg – co-author of the the recently released Long Beach: Images of America book.

I had a blast. The show is fun, light, entertaining and filled with a ton of local info. I totally recommend it. Dial in at 1040am every Tuesday between 8 & 9pm, or listen to the streams over  @ www.am1240wgbb.com.

******A quick note on the Images of America book:  You say you don’t want to buy it from the internet because you want to support our local businesses? Well, you can always buy a copy at the Long Beach Historical & Preservation Society (226 West Penn Street).  Also, this weekend at the Arts & Crafts Fair on the Boardwalk, signed copies can be purchased, so look for their table.

******A not so quick note on the Images of America book.  The book is amazing.  So many priceless photos, historical facts and tidbits. I am learning so much about this great city.  In some ways, this book is actually making me sad.  Long Beach has all this great architecture, but so much of it has disappeared.  It’s happening more and more as new crap (see 118 to 134 E. Park Avenue) is building built.  Definitely buy this book.  Maybe it will motivate a few knuckleheads over at city hall to start caring about our city’s rich character and possibly create some sort of Historical Preservation Act – similar to what the Village of Northport is doing.  GET WITH IT YOU KNUCKLEHEADS OVER AT CITY HALL, BEFORE IT’S TOO LATE. (See old Penn station photos as an example of that).  Once it’s gone, it’s gone.

Just to remind you what the folks at Northport are up to:

(The) preservation of the Village’s heritage and character by establishing a policy which will protect and enhance historic buildings in the Village will enhance the cultural, educational, economic and general welfare of the public, and ensure the harmonious, orderly and efficient growth and development of the Village consistent with its unique heritage and character.

Long Beach (Images of America Series)

Screen shot 2010-08-12 at 10.51.16 AMPart of the Images of America Series, the Long Beach edition is now available at a book store near you. Unless your local book store closed down.  In that case, buy it online.

From Amazon.com:

Product Description

In 1906, Sen. William H. Reynolds purchased an abandoned barrier island along the south shore of Long Island and vowed to turn it into a great city. What is now Long Beach, the “City by the Sea,” soon drew visitors who came for its summer resorts, boardwalk, dance pavilions, casino, and luxury hotels. Two world wars, Prohibition, and easy railroad access turned summer residences into year-long homes for thousands eager to live by the seaside and raise families in what has been known as “America’s Healthiest City.” The images of Long Beach reflect the diversity of the city’s architecture, culture, religions, and unique neighborhoods. Photographs show the storied inhabitants and bungalows of the West End, water-lined homes of the canals, the 2.1-mile boardwalk, and long white sand beach.

About the Author

The Long Beach Historical and Preservation Society was founded in 1980 by Roberta Fiore, the official historian of the City of Long Beach and lifetime trustee of the society. Carole Shahda Geraci is an educator, community activist, and president of the historical society. Dave Roochvarg, historical society trustee, is a bookseller and avid collector of Long Beach historical ephemera.